User:Martin2Reid

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Model of winder staircase made by advanced bench joinery students and cut successfully with Partworks via AutoSketch
Model of winder staircase made by advanced bench joinery students and cut successfully with Partworks via AutoSketch
As of March 2010 I'm working with Forrest Joinery Contracts, Blackburn, UK. We have an oldish 2440 x 1220 'original' shopbot and have just taken delivery of a shiny new 3000 x 1500 PRS Alpha. We are getting to grips with Partworks and Partworks3d. Being based in Blackburn Lancashire we were fortunate to be able to attend the 2006 European ShopBot Camp at the shop of Robert Lofthouse, just round the corner.


I'm a confirmed user of Google Sketchup and have models (here). I have managed to do my first 3d model for carving from sketchup into Partworks3d utilising the free plugin Convert Sketchup SKP files to DXF & STL from (here).

My Advanced Bench Joinery Students have access to my teaching resources (here). These final year apprentices were bemused when I dumped their 2d CAD drawing into Partworks, cleaned it up, created tool paths and cut the strings and treads for their turning staircase practical exercise, which took them hours to set out, prepare and cut using standard bench joinery techniques. The finished components were left in the MDF sheet with the tabs in place looking like an airfix kit of parts for the staircase model.

I'm a long time user of Autodesk Autosketch 2d drafting which copes well creating and sharing the standard DXF files used to exchange drawing information between the different design and production software. I find it more accurate using the 'snap' options and line parameters than utilising the 'guides' in Partworks.

If someone from Vectric was to ask me what I would change in Partworks it would be the addition of these 'snap' options and to standardise the zoom and pan facilities between the 2d and 3d views.

Martin Reid


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