Probes

From Shopbot Wiki

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The controlled motion capabilities of a CNC tool make it possible to use the tool to digitally sample or scan an object in order to record the shape of the object. The data from the sampling can be used to cut a new version of the part, or can be imported into a design program for further work. An object can be scanned in many ways, and the digital sampling can involve contact with a probe, or may be a non-contact process based on optical or imaging technology. In all cases, the final data are coordinate points representing either the outline of the object (2D) or its shape (3D).
The controlled motion capabilities of a CNC tool make it possible to use the tool to digitally sample or scan an object in order to record the shape of the object. The data from the sampling can be used to cut a new version of the part, or can be imported into a design program for further work. An object can be scanned in many ways, and the digital sampling can involve contact with a probe, or may be a non-contact process based on optical or imaging technology. In all cases, the final data are coordinate points representing either the outline of the object (2D) or its shape (3D).
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One of the most straightforward and least expensive approaches to digitizing is to use a contact probe, which signals each contact with an object so that the location of the probe at that point can be recorded to define a point on the surface or edge of the object. The mechanism can be as simple as a sensitive switch that is triggered by slight motion of the probe.
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== Hooking Up Your Digitizing Probe ==
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== Hooking Up Your ShopBot Digitizing Probe ==
* [[ProbeInstallationMain|Probe Installation]]
* [[ProbeInstallationMain|Probe Installation]]

Revision as of 17:43, 24 June 2007

Contents

Introduction to Digitizing

The controlled motion capabilities of a CNC tool make it possible to use the tool to digitally sample or scan an object in order to record the shape of the object. The data from the sampling can be used to cut a new version of the part, or can be imported into a design program for further work. An object can be scanned in many ways, and the digital sampling can involve contact with a probe, or may be a non-contact process based on optical or imaging technology. In all cases, the final data are coordinate points representing either the outline of the object (2D) or its shape (3D).

One of the most straightforward and least expensive approaches to digitizing is to use a contact probe, which signals each contact with an object so that the location of the probe at that point can be recorded to define a point on the surface or edge of the object. The mechanism can be as simple as a sensitive switch that is triggered by slight motion of the probe.



The first step is to mount the indexer so that it's firmly attached to the ShopBot and accurately aligned with the ShopBot's movement. Next it needs to be connected to the control box and the correct software values entered. Finally it's movement needs to be tested to make sure that everything is moving correctly.


Hooking Up Your ShopBot Digitizing Probe


Probe Operation


The Copy Machine

  • Creating Indexer files manually
  • Other software


Doing "Outlines" with the Probe

  • Manual Indexing and multisided cutting


Probing without a Probe

  • Manual Indexing and multisided cutting

Contributors
Ted, Martin2Reid
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